Movie : Searching For Sugarman

Searching For Sugarman
sugarman
Searching For Sugarman
Rodriguez was the greatest ’70s U.S. rock icon who never was. His albums were critically well-received, but sales bombed, and he faded away into obscurity among rumors of a gruesome death. However, as fate would have it, a bootleg copy of his record made its way to South Africa, where his music became a phenomenal success. In a country suppressed by apartheid, his antiestablishment message connected with the people.

When his second album finally gets released on CD in South Africa, two fans take it as a sign, deciding to look into the mystery of how Rodriguez died and what happened to all of the profits from his album sales. Since very little information about the singer exists, they meet many obstacles until they uncover a shocking revelation that sets off a wild chain of events that has to be seen to be believed. SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN is a story of hope, inspiration, and the resonating power of music.
official Website : Sugarman.org

Award Winner
World Cinema Documentary Special Jury Prize for its Celebration of the Artistic Spirit
World Cinema Audience Award: Documentary
Click here for award screening information
– T.G.


Searching For Sugarman
This is Swedish director Malik Bendjelloul’s first feature film. He has previously directed a body of short documentaries about renowned musical artists, including Björk, Kraftwerk, Sting, Elton John, Rod Stewart, and Madonna.

OkayAfrika article:
rodriguez-Cold-Fact-USA

Detroit singer/songwriter Rodriguez’s 1970 debut Cold Fact probably first arrived in South Africa by non-commercial means. The album was celebrated by a politically and culturally stifled public but severely censured by the apartheid regime. Any copies of the record meant for promotional use were subject to physical damage rendering a selection of songs unplayable on the radio.

Still, Cold Fact found its way into thousands of South African homes and record stores. While the album celebrated a matter-of-fact political cynicism not unprecedented in the US, its blatant critique of politics and a general delight in hippy culture marked it as legitimate protest music in South Africa. Despite reflecting a decaying American city, songs like “The Establishment Blues” and “I Wonder” became anthemic protests of apartheid and cultural conservatism for many South Africans. And while Cold Fact rivaled the popularity of American pop hits in South Africa, its listeners there knew virtually nothing of the artist behind it.

The album artwork (above) depicts Rodriguez obscured by a low hat and dark shades. The writing credits further shadow the singer, crediting songs to both Jesus Rodriguez and Sixth Prince (a handle crafted from his name “Sixto Diaz”). The mystery did little to stifle the appetite for his music; Rodriguez’ 1971 sophomore album Coming From Reality and later reissues of both LPs would go on to sell wonderfully in South Africa (Coming From Reality was released as After The Fact there).
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