CFP Future Present Current Practices in Pop Music Studies

Future Present Current Practices in Pop Music Studies

19-20 June 2018; Department of Musicology, Uppsala University, Sweden
From its emergence, pop music, broadly defined, has been conceptualized as a culturally embedded practice. Adapting theoretical and methodological tools from various fields, its study has transgressed disciplinary boundaries and emphasized the complex relations of the cultural, socio-economic, and political contexts of pop music. This conference seeks to provide a space for deep engagements in pop music and its various contexts. It aims to explore current theoretical and methodological developments in pop music studies across thematic and disciplinary borders, and to foster discourse surrounding future directions in pop music and its study.
We invite abstract submissions in the following areas:
Current Pop Analyses: This theme seeks to explore contemporary analytical practices and to foster discussions surrounding methodological practices in contemporary and future pop music research.

Current Pop Theories: This theme seeks to map current cross-disciplinary approaches towards pop music study, including but not limited to Musicology, Philosophy, Cultural, Gender, Sound and Media Studies.

Current Pop Sounds: This theme invites work exploring current sounds of pop music, including artists, songs, as well as recent sonic developments related to voice(s), rhythmic patterns, recording practices.

Abstract submissions: 350 words

Abstract deadline: December 3, 2017

Abstracts will be selected on the basis of their investment in the conference themes. Please note the theme you wish to participate in. We especially encourage submissions from scholars in early stages of the careers.

To submit abstracts and for more information:

futurepresentpop -at- musik.uu.se

Keynote speakers:

Robin James (University of North Carolina at Charlotte); author of Resilience and melancholy: Music, feminism, neoliberalism

Anne Danielsen (University of Oslo); co-author (with Ragnhild Brøvig-Hanssen) of The impact of digitization on popular music sound